Letter to Rev. W. Laporte Payne 19 Nov 14

Letter to Rev. W. Laporte Payne 19 Nov 14

 

(8055) 4th Dragoon Gds

Jarvis St Hospital

Dublin

Ireland

19-11-14

 

Dear Sir,

 

Just a line to thank you for your welcome letter which I was very pleased to receive also the Testament. Well I do not know how long I shall be here as I had an operation a week ago, the doctors said that another half an inch and I should have been paralysed in both legs.  They took a splinter of my spine out in the operation so you see what a near thing it was.  It was at Messines where I was hit it was a terrible battle the sights were awful.  We were retiring as there only two regiments of cavalry trying to hold them back until the infantry could come up they numbered about 20 to our one.  We held them a day and a night but they were to much for us.  They were eventually driven back in the evening though I had left the firing line and was bringing a chum back who was wounded but we had not got far when a shell burst a few feet away that was all I remembered until I came too and when I started to crawl along about thirty Germans started firing at me but there I expect you have already heard what sort of men they are, they size all right killing our wounded, to come out and face our steel they never will with-out their artillery.  They would be lost, they even stripped our dead and wounded so as to wear our clothing to deceive us but they are paying dearly for it, and yet more so before they are finished.  Well I think I will close now.  Hoping to see you soon

Yours ever

 

Alfred Lilly.

Advertisements

Nov 1914

Army Form B 261.

APPLICABLE TO ENGLAND.

———————————————

ORDER FOR THE RECEPTION OF A DANGEROUS

LUNATIC SOLDIER.

——————————————————-

Whereas, by the Army Act, section 91, as amended by the Army (Annual) Acts, 1899 and 1909, it is provided that the Army Council, or any Officer deputed by them for the purpose, may, if they or he think proper, on account of a soldier’s lunacy, cause any soldier of the regular forces, on his discharge, to be sent to the parish or union to which under the statutes for the time being in force he appears, from the statements made in his attestation paper, and other available information, to be chargeable; and such soldier, if delivered after reasonable notice, in England or Ireland at the workhouse in which persons settled in such parish, shall be received, and in Scotland to the inspector of poor of such parish, or union are received by the master or other proper officer of such workhouse, or such inspector of poor, as the case may be; and it is further provided by the said Act as so amended that the Army Council or any Officer deputed by them for the purpose, where it appears to them or him that any such soldier is a dangerous lunatic, and is in such a state of health as not to be liable to suffer bodily or mental injury by his removal, may, by order signified under their or his hand, send such lunatic direct to an asylum, registered hospital, licensed house, or other place in which pauper lunatics can legally be confined, and for the purpose of the said order the above-mentioned parish or union shall be deemed to be the parish or union from which such lunatic is sent, and that in England the lunatic shall be sent to the asylum, hospital, house or place to which a person in the workhouse aforesaid, on becoming a dangerous lunatic, can by law be removed; and it is further provided by the said Act, as amended by the Army (Annual) Acts, 1891, 1894, 1899, and 1909, that an order of the Army Council or Officer under section 91 of the Army Act, shall be of the same effect as a Summary Reception Order, within the meaning of the Lunacy Act, 1890; and the like proceedings shall be taken thereon as on an Order under that Act. *

 

* Note – Where the order directs the Lunatic to be received into any Asylum other than an Asylum of the County or Borough in which the Parish or Place from which the Lunatic is sent is situate, or into a Registered Hospital of Licensed House, it should state that the Army Council or Officer is satisfied that there is no Asylum of such County or Borough, or that there is a deficiency of room in such Asylum, or as the case may be, the special circumstances by reason whereof the Lunatic cannot conveniently be taken to an Asylum for such first-mentioned County or Borough.

 

Page 2.

 

And whereas it appears to me the undersigned being an Officer deputed by the Army Council for the purpose, from the statements made in the attestation paper of No 18134 Pte. Henry King a soldier, now of the Worcestershire Regt Corps, but about to be discharged therefrom, and from other information, that the said Henry King is, or on his discharge will be a pauper chargeable to the Parish of Poplar in the County [or Borough] of London.

And whereas it also appears to me from the Medical Certificate annexed that the said Henry King is a dangerous lunatic, and is in such a state of health as not to suffer bodily or mental injury by his removal.

 

And whereas it has been represented to me [that the Asylum at Woodford Bridge for the said County [or Borough] of London] is a place to which a dangerous lunatic if an inmate of the Workhouse, of the said Union or [Parish] could by Law be removed.

 

Now I hereby order and desire you to receive the said Henry King, as a patient into your Asylum.  Subjoined is a statement of particulars respecting the said Henry King.

  1. Dated the Sixth day of November 1914.
  2. Signed A. Altham M.G.

                            i/c Administration for General Officer Commanding in Chief Southern Command (absent on Duty)

 

to the Superintendent of the Claybury Asylum, Woodford Bridge

Asylum for the County of London,

or, the Lunatic Hospital of    or

Proprietor of the Licensed House of

 

Page 3.

 

STATEMENT of particulars relating to the said        Henry King

Name of patient, with Christian Name at length        King Henry

Age                                                                                         22 11/12 years

Married , Single, or Widower                                     Single

Name or Number of Corps, and Rank                        Worcestershire Regiment. Private

Religious Persuasion                                                  Church of England

Whether First Attack                                                  Yes

Age (if known) on First Attack                                  22

Supposed Cause                                                          –

Duration of Existing Attack                                       7 days

Supposed Cause                                                          Unknown

Whether subject to Epilepsy                                       No

Whether Suicidal                                                        No

Whether of temperate habits                                       Yes

Union or Parish to which the Lunatic}

appears to be chargeable                     }                      Poplar

Name and Address of Relative to whom}

Notice of Death to be sent                     }                  (Mother) Mrs. King, 20 Cahir                                                                             Street, Millwall Poplar.

 

Signed, Name, E. Hewitt

Major R.A.M.C., Registrar.

                                                            Royal Victoria Hospital, Netley

To be signed by Officer Commanding

Corps or Regiment.

 

Back page.

 

MEDICAL CERTIFICATE

———————————–

I, the undersigned O. J. Stephenson being a person registered under the Medical Acts, and being in the actual practice of the Medical Profession, hereby certify, that I, on the fourth day of November at D Block, Royal V. Hosp Netley in the County of Hampshire personally examined Henry King a Soldier of the 11th Worcester Regt Corps, and that the said Soldier is a dangerous Lunatic and a proper person to be taken charge of and detained under Care and Treatment, and is in such a state of health as not to suffer bodily or mental injury by his removal, and that I have formed this opinion upon the following grounds, viz: –

  1. Facts indicating dangerous Insanity observed by myself

Patient has aural & visual hallucinations, his memory is poor, is rambling and confused at times, & cannot fix his attention.

  1. Other facts (if any) indicating dangerous Insanity communicated to me by others: Sergt Major H***, Pt has an insane expression, is slovenly & unresponsive, hears voices; & talks to imaginary people.

 

Signed, Name O. J. Stephenson

Place of Abode D Block, R. V. Hosp Netley.

Dated this fourth day of November One Thousand Nine Hundred and                    fourteen.

 

 

Pasted inside:

 

D Block R.V.H. INSTITUTION

Netley

To the Superintendent of the

COUNTY OF LONDON

LUNATIC ASYLUM at Claybury Woodford Bridge.

 

I hereby certify that No. 18134 Pte H. King 11 Worc Rgt is free from any infectious or contagious disease, and that, in my opinion, his admission into the above Asylum will not be attended with any risk of infection to the inmates thereof.

Signed Unreadable

Lieut R.A.M.C.  Medical Officer

Dated this 10th day of November 1914

 

Also a letter:

3 Cahir Street

Millwall E

July 13th 1915

Sir,

Many thanks for the discharge book which we received alright, this morning relating to my step-son Henry King (6770). Again thanking you for past kindness to him whilst he was a patient with you.

I remain

Your Humble Servant

  1. Parkin.

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne Nov 1914

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne

 

Extracted from

 

Brigade Diary, Personal Diary, Operation Orders, Note Books, Memoranda &

Correspondence

—————–

 

November 1914

 

1

Nov 13th 1914

 

 

Sir,

I desire to apply for leave from 12, noon on Saturday, November, 14th 1914, to midnight on Sunday November, 15th 1914.

I have the honour to be,

Your obedient servant

A.A. LAPRORT Payne

2/Lieut R.F.A.

 

O.C. 260th Battery

R.F.A. Colchester

II

Forwarded and recommended

H.F.T. Blowey

Lieut R.F.A.

O.C. 260th Battery R.F.A.

 

To O.C. 83rd Brigade R.F.A.

Colchester

3

  1. Commanding 260th Battery R.F.A.

Returned. Brigade Order No. 145 has not been complied with

  1. Hanna

Colonel R.F.A.

Commanding 83rd Brigade R.F.A.

Colchester, 13.11.14

 

Monday November 16 1914

R.P.

“Tomorrow I hope to go into a billet. It will only cost me threepence a day over the amount I am allowed for living out, which is 4/9 per day.

 

November 27

 

“We have a new Battery Commander, the last having left for France to join the Royal Flying Corps.

 

My host’s brother, Major Chopping R.A.M.C. has arrived tonight from Ypres for a short holiday of 3 days.  He has told me a great deal of interesting information.  He says that our troops can only hold the Germans for the present, and nothing further.  The men are worn out with constant marching & fighting.

 

I see Huntriss, whom I knew at Salisbury, has been wounded.

 

Archie A. Laporte Payne letters home November 1914

Archie A. Laporte Payne letters home November 1914

 

On embossed Government notepaper.

 

R.A. Mess

Colchester

 

Monday Nov 1914

 

My dearest Mother & Father,

 

Many thanks for your letters and parcel of washing. I am glad of a silk handkerchief too.  I brought one the other day – a silk one – and then tried to wash it and all the colour came out.  We are as you can imagine very busy.

 

I arrived back safely last Sunday and found things much as usual. The magazines proved very acceptable to the men in barracks.  I have been out riding most days this week.  On Saturday I had four hours in the saddle.  I may have to go to Ipswich after all.  It will be further away from home but it will be nicer there I think.  I do not like Colchester at all.

 

We had church parade yesterday morning as usual. I was in command of our battery.

 

I have called on the Harrises twice lately but they have been out both times.

 

How are things going in Finchley? I hope well.  I am sorry Father has a sore throat.  I hope it is better now, and also Mother’s throat.  I expect Evelyn is enjoying herself in Bath.  Tell Maude to come down here by a cheap train with someone nice if she can get off.  I could see her once or twice during the day.  There is no where to go down here and nothing to do unfortunately.

 

I don’t know when I shall be able to get away again. I enjoyed my last week end very much indeed.  It was all too short though we are still under canvas but I don’t mind it a bit now.  It has been extraordinarily mild although a trifle damp.

 

The news from the front is much better to-day. It rests to a great extent with the Russians I think.

 

If you hear of anyone with a good pair of field glasses – I should be glad of them.

 

Hoping you are all well with much love to you & all

Ever

Your loving son

Archie.

 

 

On embossed headed notepaper.

 

Royal Field Artillery

Colchester.

R.A. Crest.

Monday Nov 16 1914

 

My dearest Mother & Father,

 

I enjoyed my short visit to you very much indeed. I was glad to find you all well and everything going well.  I got back here quite safely and am hard at work again.  Tomorrow I hope to go into a billet.  I find it will only cost me 3d a day over the amount I am allowed for living out which is 4/9 per day.

 

Please tell Maude to give me due notice when she is coming down. Don’t you think she might stay the night here if she came down with somebody?  I can make all arrangements.

 

With much love to you & all.

 

Ever

Your affectionate son

Archie

 

 

On plain notepaper.

R.A. Mess

Colchester.

Nov 27th 1914

My dearest Mother & Father,

 

Thank you very much for your letters and parcel of washing which arrived quite safely. I am so sorry to hear that Eve has been so unwell.  I hope you have better news of her now.

 

Things go much as usual now we have got a new battery commander. The other man having left for France to do Reconnaissance work in the Royal Flying Corps.

 

My host’s brother Major Chopping R.A.M.C. has arrived tonight from Ypres in France for a short holiday of 3 days – for a rest and to get married.  He has been telling me a lot of interesting news from the front.  He says all our men are doing and can do is to hold the Germans for the present.  The men are worn out with constant marching & fighting.

 

I am very sorry you have had all that trouble about a sword. It was very good of you to trouble so much.  It was the fault of those stupid people Kinos.

 

Anyhow I am glad you have got the money back. I shan’t trouble about a sword just at present.  They may be cheaper & better later on.

 

I had dinner at the Harris’ on Wednesday night & took a friend with me. I see some stupid man (probably a slacker) has been criticising the probable granting of a week’s leave about Christmas time.  I wish I could get him here & let my men have a go at him.

 

I am sorry to hear about Mr Sherlock. It is very sad for his sons.  I see Hunters – my Salisbury friend has been wounded at the front.

 

No doubt everything is prospering favourably at Finchley, at least I hope so and that you are all keeping well.

 

The weather is very changeable here. Last night it rained very hard.  I am afraid I can’t get away this week end.  Perhaps it is just as well as it is rather expensive travelling.

 

When does Evelyn come home? I suppose soon now & then it will be Maude’s turn.

 

With much love to you & all.

 

Ever

Your affect son

Archie

Without cover.

 

A.A. Laporte Payne November 1914

A.A. Laporte Payne November 1914

I

Nov 13th 1914

 

 

Sir,

I desire to apply for leave from 12, noon on Saturday, November, 14th 1914, to midnight on Sunday November, 15th 1914.

I have the honour to be,

Your obedient servant

A.A. LAPRORT Payne

2/Lieut R.F.A.

 

O.C. 260th Battery

R.F.A. Colchester

II

Forwarded and recommended

H.F.T. Blowey

Lieut R.F.A.

O.C. 260th Battery R.F.A.

 

To O.C. 83rd Brigade R.F.A.

Colchester

3

  1. Commanding 260th Battery R.F.A.

Returned. Brigade Order No. 145 has not been complied with

  1. Hanna

Colonel R.F.A.

Commanding 83rd Brigade R.F.A.

Colchester, 13.11.14

 

Monday November 16 1914

 

“Tomorrow I hope to go into a billet. It will only cost me threepence a day over the amount I am allowed for living out, which is 4/9 per day.

 

November 27

 

“We have a new Battery Commander, the last having left for France to join the Royal Flying Corps.

 

My host’s brother, Major Chopping R.A.M.C. has arrived tonight from Ypres for a short holiday of 3 days.  He has told me a great deal of interesting information.  He says that our troops can only hold the Germans for the present, and nothing further.  The men are worn out with constant marching & fighting.

 

I see Huntriss, whom I knew at Salisbury, has been wounded.

 

Hammond letter 15 Nov 1914

9 Countess Street Stockport

15/11/14

 

Dear W,

I suppose you are wondering how we are all getting along.  Fred got back last Monday & said what an enjoyable time he had had.  He & his friend Earlam sent off their application for service abroad, but have received no reply up to now.  We have tried to dissuade George from joining the army but he has definitely decided to join some Regiment tomorrow morning.  Arthur Boon has joined the 7th Manchester’s & George will either join the same or the Public Schools Brigade which is just forming.  We regret the necessity of him taking this course but cannot under the circumstances refuse our consent.  Gladys feels very proud of him & is pleased that he is so patriotic.

We hope he will prove a valiant soldier & pray that he may return to us unhurt.  The home will be very quiet when both of them are away.

However we shall have to brace ourselves up to the necessities of the times.

Gladys has been to the dentist & had ½ dog teeth filled, but as we have not yet had the bill we cannot say what the cost will be.

 

Ma, Gladys & I went to a whist drive & dance last Thursday & Ma brought home the 2nd prize which was a very handsome Lady’s Satchel.  We had a very good time.  Gladys has been spending the weekend at Mrs. Leah’s.  We are expecting her back tonight.

Business is very scarce & lapses numerous.

I am still a little increase however.

We are not so far off Xmas when I hope we may all meet together again

With love from all

Pa.