Dick-Cunyngham letter to wife dated 28 Sept 1914

Dick-Cunyngham letter to wife dated 28 Sept 1914

My darling one,

Just a line, have been out all afternoon & post goes at 7 p.m. Enclosure for perusal! & safe keeping. 2 letters today from you also Kolgnos – powder & Formamint, most useful – Poor little Aunt Lalla, Gina wrote, and added at the last moment news of her death; it is very sad, she had always been wonderfully kind & good to us all – I am so glad you were able to see her before she died – I’m afraid my last letter to her will not have reached home yet – if you get it, destroy it, won’t you.

I hope Wilke’s Bn won’t come out; I don’t think it will, and I also hope Charlie’s Staff billet under Parsons in Ireland will keep him at home.

My poor Darling what a round of my relations you must have had, rather trying – Dear Gina was so pleased to see you and said you were looking so sweet, well & good looking – my Darling one what would I give for a glimpse of you!

Goodnight precious one. Mark up Betty for her dear little letter.

Yr devoted Hubby.

With envelope addressed to Mrs Dick Cunyngham, Mount View, Crownhill S.O., S. Devon. Signed Dick Cunyngham. Passed by Censor No 224 cachet. Postmarked ARMY POST OFFICE 42 dated SP 29 14

Kaiser’s note 25 September 1914

Kaiser’s note 25 September 1914

(Published with Routine Orders of September 24th 1914)

The following is a copy of Orders issued by the German Emperor on the 19th of August:-

It is my Royal and Imperial command that you concentrate your energies, for the immediate present, upon one single purpose, and that is that you address all your skill and all the valour of my soldiers to exterminate first, the treacherous English, walk over General French’s contemptible little army….

Headquarters
Aix-la-Chapelle, August, 19th.

The results of the order were the operations commencing with Mons and the advance of the seemingly overwhelming masses against us.

The answer of the British Army on the subject of extermination has already been given.

Printing Co., R.E. 69.

Field Service Post Card to Dick-Cunyngham’s wife dated 20 Sept 1914

Field Service Post Card to Dick-Cunyngham’s wife dated 20 Sept 1914

I am quite well

I have been admitted to hospital sick wounded and am going on well.

I am being sent down to the base.

I have received your 10 letters dated telegram 2 parcels

Letter follows at first opportunity.

I have received no letter from you lately for a long time.

Signature only: J.K. Dick Cunyngham

Date Sep 20th.

Addressed to Mrs Dick Cunyngham, Mount View, Crownhill S.O., S. Devon. England. Postmarked ARMY POST OFFICE 42 dated SP 20 14

Dick-Cunyngham letter to wife dated 10 Sept 1914

Dick-Cunyngham letter to wife dated 10 Sept 1914
Sept 10
My darling one,
I am such a happy boy with a mail today, letter 2 & 3 arrived also 3 others, and we have been longing for news for days & days – my precious one what a journey back you must have had, do you mean to say you did it all alone without a man of any kind? I always understood you were taking a man – I heard from Charlie your journey was adventurous & was really getting anxious – The little photo is quite sweet, and it is so nice to have it.

You must all be pleased with the news now. The tables seem turned in the opposite direction and the only bad point is the discomfort of following behind an army – filth & dirt are not pleasing but our Med Off is tackling it well.

I managed to get some cigars & cigarettes so am full of smokes. Am wondering if my uniform will hang out much longer – my one coat is dirty my tartan knickers are stained, petrol only seems to clean them for a day or so – we had rain yesterday which has laid the dust & it is cooler – flies are beginning to increase & worry.

I fear there are many anxious ones at home, the long list of heroes – I cannot help thinking that some of the Regt will eventually turn up & that they are not all dead, it cannot be so. So many have turned up suddenly from anywhere.

Country now is very short of supplies, we have to send the French officers in cars to forage in the rear – but all our supplies come up wonderfully well fed with bread, meat, cheese, bacon jam & Rhum when wanted – motors have made enormous differences in supply – we are halted today, have time to settle up my work & write.

Prisoners are passing through they say they are very glad to be taken by us, and our men are good to them giving them water & rations.

Daily Graphic of 8th actually here today – I enclose a line to mother, please send on.
All my love, god keep you safe
Yr
Jimmie

With envelope addressed to Mrs J. Dick Cunyngham, Mount View, Crownhill S.O., S. Devon. England. Signed Dick Cunyngham. Passed by Censor No 224 cachet. Postmarked ARMY POST OFFICE 42 SP 13 14 & ARMY BASE POST OFFICE dated SP 17. 14

Dick-Cunyngham letter to wife dated 5 Sept 1914

Dick-Cunyngham letter to wife dated 5 Sept 1914
Sep 5
My darling one,

I seem to have so little time to write but things are better tonight & I have time. Times still very strenuous – I fear news of Regt is very sad but we must hope for the best – I saw the few two days ago all very well & cheery – Willie Marshall feels it badly – have only just heard poor Shafto’s death – I am so sorry & I fear it will be some time before complete lists are out.

Still very hot by day & I long for Indian khaki – I find I sleep almost better outside than in a house & it is much more healthy.

My precious one I do long for news of you, mails have been very bad, only 2 letters so far, but will probably get a bunch in a day or two. Days have gone so wearily I have lost count completely – I believe it is Sunday tomorrow.

Find it hard to get cigarettes here – a kind man gave me ½ dozen yesterday – your meat lozenges are very useful & they do keep one going especially during a night march – I suck 2 or 3 & they help to keep me awake.

We are such a party now, nearly 40, difficult to feed, but so far resources of country have saved us. I see I am graded for A.P.M. as a D.A.A.G. Deputy Assistant Adjt Gen which means I believe pay at 550£ per annum. Far more than I expected or deserve. Would you keep a Copy of Gazette giving all names of Staff of Exp Force.

I do so long to have a peep at you in the little house, hope Mrs Clue is doing you well. Charlie writes your journey was exciting. I always thought it would be with Rhoda & her car. Dinner time not bad cook. Hope to learn how to make omelette before long –

All my love, my darling, one & kisses for Betty
Yr own Jimmie

With envelope addressed to Mrs Dick Cunyngham, Mount View, Crownhill S.O., S. Devon. England. Redirected to 72 Overstrand Mansions, Prince of Wales Rd, Battersea Park, London S.W. Signed Dick Cunyngham. Passed Army Censor No 224. Postmarked ARMY POST OFFICE 42 dated SP 6 14. Also postmarked Crownhill 7.30 p.m 16 Sp 14.

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne Sept 1914

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne

 

Extracted from

 

Brigade Diary, Personal Diary, Operation Orders, Note Books, Memoranda &

Correspondence

—————–

 

September 1914

 

UNIVERSITIES & PUBLIC SCHOOLS FORCES

ROYAL FUSILIERS

 

EPSOM September, 1914

 

1st Battalion, No 1 Company, Section 4.

 

J.P.D. Clarke.  Sergt.   “Long John”    C.C.C. Camb X

Williams          “Bimph”                                  X

Osborne           “Ossy”

Harry Richards            “Loose Lizzy”

Roland Richards         “Rolly”                                    X

E.C. Collins                 “Lottie”           C.C.C. Camb

P.D. Gilmour Ellis       “Gil”

A.A. Laporte Payne    “Algy”             C.C.C. Camb

 

———————–

 

September 20 1914

R.P.

Sunday

Alton

Links Road

Epsom

“I was first of all billeted in a public house with three other men. When in the town later I met a friend who said he was in a palace, so I got leave from a Special Constable to move there.  On the next day, most unfortunately, we were re-billeted by companies, and we have landed up in a much smaller house and the food is not nearly as good.  But eight of us all friends are billeted together in two adjacent houses.  It is great fun.  I have met several men I know.  There are 3500 of us here now.  I dined out this evening with Richards at the house of friends of his, named Mountain.

 

SEPTEMBER 24th 1914

 

Having obtained leave of absence I called on Major C. Lancelot Storr, Rom 206, War Office, who took details of such qualifications as I had, and said he would do what he could. He informed me that the application from Cambridge University had been mislaid, but that he would put a fresh application for a commission through for me.

 

I obtained leave to go to town by saying that the War Office wanted to interview me. So a full blown private marched boldly into the “Holy of Holies, armed with a sheet of foolscap on which I had set out my name, age, school, University, degree honours, cadet corps service, and the fact that I had been for four weeks or so a private in H.M. Army.

 

I received the advice from an old soldier that “ the thing to do is to make the most of yourself, and not belittle your achievements. Humility does not pay in the army.”

 

 

September 24th 1914

PUBLIC SCHOOL BRIGADE

ROYAL FUSILIERS

 

Private A.A.L. Payne has leave of absence until 10 p.m. September, 24th 1914

 

H.E. Bowes Lyon

O.C. No 1 Company,

No 1 Battalion.

 

 

W.L.P.

“Colonel Griffin ….. is wondering what the War Office have done for you today, and says if you would like a commission in his battalion, the 11th Middlesex Regiment, write to the Officer Commanding this regiment, Hydrabad Barracks, Colchester, and ask for a commission as a 2/Lieut.  State all qualifications.  There is at present one vacancy for a 2nd Lieut. And one or two vacancies in the 12th and 13th Battalions.

Our love to you, my son. May the right decision be clear.  I esteem your prompt response to the call of duty.  The strongest fortress of prayer is yours.

Your affectionate Father.

 

Form M.T. 397                                                                        WAR OFFICE

LONDON, S.W.

25th September 1914

 

Sir,

With reference to your application for appointment to the Special Reserve of Officers, I am directed to inform you that the applications for such appointments already received are far in excess of the vacancies available. It has therefore not been practicable to grant you a commission in the Special Reserve.

I am to say, however, that your name has been placed on a waiting list of candidates for appointment to a temporary regular commission for the period of the war, and you will be duly informed if, and when, there is a vacancy to which you can be appointed.

If you are desirous of taking up such an appointment it will not be necessary for you (or any other person on your behalf) to address any further communication to this Office on the subject. Owing to pressure of work it will not be practicable to reply to such communication if sent.

If, however, you do not wish to be appointed to a temporary regular commission you should at once notify the fact to this Office.

 

I am,

Sir,

Your Obedient Servant,

  1. Grant, Captain

for Director of Military Training.

 

Secretary of State for War.                                                                 War Office,

Whitehall,

S.W.

25 Sept 1914

 

Dear Mr. Payne,

I have handed your application personally to the Assistant Military Secretary, so I hope you will be fixed up before long. You may have to wait a week or two.

In the meantime, get Major Griffin to apply officially for you to go to him directly you are gazetted and ask him to address the envelope to me by name to save time. Let me hear if you are not fixed up, say, in 3 weeks time.

Very truly yours

  1. Storr.

Colchester

28.9.14

Sir,

As I have no vacancies for officers in my battalion I have forwarded your letter to Colonel Glover, commanding 12th Middlesex Regiment.

Yours faithfully

W.D. Ingle

Lieut. Colonel

Comdg. 11th Middlesex Regt.

 

Form M.T. 426 (M.T. 3)                                                                      WAR OFFICE

LONDON S.W.

30th September, 1914.

Sir,

I am directed to inform you that your application for an appointment to a Temporary Commission in the Regular Army has been received. The Cavalry List is full at present.  Will you kindly state by return if possible, whether you desire to be considered for appointment to a Temporary Commission in the Royal Field Artillery.

Please state exactly what previous military experience you have had and also what standard of riding you have attained. If you have hunted state for how many seasons and with what pack etc.

I am,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant

E.B. CLIVE Capt.

for Director of Military Training.

AA Laporte Payne Sept 1914

EPSOM September, 1914

 

1st Battalion, No 1 Company, Section 4.

 

J.P.D. Clarke.  Sergt.   “Long John”    C.C.C. Camb X

Williams          “Bimph”                                  X

Osborne           “Ossy”

Harry Richards            “Loose Lizzy”

Roland Richards         “Rolly”                                    X

E.C. Collins                 “Lottie”           C.C.C. Camb

P.D. Gilmour Ellis       “Gil”

A.A. Laporte Payne    “Algy”             C.C.C. Camb

 

———————–

 

September 20 1914

 

Sunday

Alton

Links Road

Epsom

“I was first of all billeted in a public house with three other men. When in the town later I met a friend who said he was in a palace, so I got leave from a Special Constable to move there.  On the next day, most unfortunately, we were re-billeted by companies, and we have landed up in a much smaller house and the food is not nearly as good.  But eight of us all friends are billeted together in two adjacent houses.  It is great fun.  I have met several men I know.  There are 3500 of us here now.  I dined out this evening with Richards at the house of friends of his, named Mountain.

 

SEPTEMBER 24th 1914

 

Having obtained leave of absence I called on Major C. Lancelot Storr, Rom 206, War Office, who took details of such qualifications as I had, and said he would do what he could. He informed me that the application from Cambridge University had been mislaid, but that he would put a fresh application for a commission through for me.

 

I obtained leave to go to town by saying that the War Office wanted to interview me. So a full blown private marched boldly into the “Holy of Holies, armed with a sheet of foolscap on which I had set out my name, age, school, University, degree honours, cadet corps service, and the fact that I had been for four weeks or so a private in H.M. Army.

 

I received the advice from an old soldier that “ the thing to do is to make the most of yourself, and not belittle your achievements. Humility does not pay in the army.”

 

 

September 24th 1914

PUBLIC SCHOOL BRIGADE

ROYAL FUSILIERS

 

Private A.A.L. Payne has leave of absence until 10 p.m. September, 24th 1914

 

H.E. Bowes Lyon

O.C. No 1 Company,

No 1 Battalion.

 

 

W.L.P.

“Colonel Griffin ….. is wondering what the War Office have done for you today, and says if you would like a commission in his battalion, the 11th Middlesex Regiment, write to the Officer Commanding this regiment, Hydrabad Barracks, Colchester, and ask for a commission as a 2/Lieut.  State all qualifications.  There is at present one vacancy for a 2nd Lieut. And one or two vacancies in the 12th and 13th Battalions.

Our love to you, my son. May the right decision be clear.  I esteem your prompt response to the call of duty.  The strongest fortress of prayer is yours.

Your affectionate Father.

 

Form M.T. 397                                                                        WAR OFFICE

LONDON, S.W.

25th September 1914

 

Sir,

With reference to your application for appointment to the Special Reserve of Officers, I am directed to inform you that the applications for such appointments already received are far in excess of the vacancies available. It has therefore not been practicable to grant you a commission in the Special Reserve.

I am to say, however, that your name has been placed on a waiting list of candidates for appointment to a temporary regular commission for the period of the war, and you will be duly informed if, and when, there is a vacancy to which you can be appointed.

If you are desirous of taking up such an appointment it will not be necessary for you (or any other person on your behalf) to address any further communication to this Office on the subject. Owing to pressure of work it will not be practicable to reply to such communication if sent.

If, however, you do not wish to be appointed to a temporary regular commission you should at once notify the fact to this Office.

 

I am,

Sir,

Your Obedient Servant,

  1. Grant, Captain

for Director of Military Training.

 

Secretary of State for War.                                                                 War Office,

Whitehall,

S.W.

25 Sept 1914

 

Dear Mr. Payne,

I have handed your application personally to the Assistant Military Secretary, so I hope you will be fixed up before long. You may have to wait a week or two.

In the meantime, get Major Griffin to apply officially for you to go to him directly you are gazetted and ask him to address the envelope to me by name to save time. Let me hear if you are not fixed up, say, in 3 weeks time.

Very truly yours

  1. Storr.

 

Colchester

28.9.14

Sir,

As I have no vacancies for officers in my battalion I have forwarded your letter to Colonel Glover, commanding 12th Middlesex Regiment.

Yours faithfully

W.D. Ingle

Lieut. Colonel

Comdg. 11th Middlesex Regt.

 

Form M.T. 426 (M.T. 3)                                                                      WAR OFFICE

LONDON S.W.

30th September, 1914.

Sir,

I am directed to inform you that your application for an appointment to a Temporary Commission in the Regular Army has been received. The Cavalry List is full at present.  Will you kindly state by return if possible, whether you desire to be considered for appointment to a Temporary Commission in the Royal Field Artillery.

Please state exactly what previous military experience you have had and also what standard of riding you have attained. If you have hunted state for how many seasons and with what pack etc.

I am,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant

E.B. CLIVE Capt.

for Director of Military Training.