Dick-Cunyngham letter to wife dated 29 Apr 1915

Dick-Cunyngham letter to wife dated 29 Apr 1915
Thursday 29th
My own darling one,

Two dear long letters from you yesterday dated 25th, yes one has been busy but although the actual fighting has not been near us, we have come in for a good measure of bombardment of the Salient. No the little farm house has not been hit yet, nearest within about 6 yards, but bits often come back and hit the roof.

One is getting a little tired of incessant banging all day long and it seems such a sin, on such perfect days, to be sitting in trenches ‘potting’ at one another & shelling every corner where anyone may be all day and night.

At last I was able to get out last night & went with Th on a tour of inspection and I am glad to say since our last visit there has been some very good work done so now I hope we shall carry on at a greater pace, things have been slow, for we have all our reserves out digging on other lines.

One longs to be in a peaceful clime these lovely days – a nice country walk with my darlings & Fritz (how is he) just perfect peace and happiness.

Darling One I think it would be quite a good idea for you all 3 to join hands in a house. Somehow Wimbledon reminds me of the Clark family and I can never imagine you there. I think I shall have to come home and help you chose. I am glad you are going to remain with Edie & I really think Gertie would love to join you both – What a nice establishment it would be. I should appoint you financial advisor, and treasurer.

Well, day’s work must be arranged. So no more will try & write to Charlie but tell him I think it is perfectly sweet of him to have given us those things from the Old House.

My eyes are practically all right again only a little bit red – Darling only want a tin of Colegate’s Violet Talc powder, so nice after a bath in a greasy wooden tub!

Much quieter today scarcely a gun firing at the present moment.

All my love my precious one,
Ever yr devoted Hubby
Jimmie

With black edged envelope addressed to Mrs J. Dick Cunyngham, Heslington, Croft Road. Crowborough, England. Signed Dick Cunyngham. Passed by Censor No 73 cachet. Postmarked FIELD POST OFFICE 15 dated 29 AP 15. Marked On Active Service.

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George Ryan’s letter home dated 15 April 1915

George Ryan’s letter home dated 15 April 1915

  1. ‘D’ Co

9th Middx

Barrackpore

Bengal

India.

15 April 1915

 

Dear M & F,

 

Your letter of March 18th received.  Glad to hear Dad has been a bit busy but I suppose it won’t last long.  Hope his feet are better.

 

I had a letter from Bert this week; he must be having a jolly rough time. He doesn’t seem to think the war will be over just yet, not before next Christmas, he says.  I suppose they discuss it every other day in the trenches the same as we do here.  I think I’ve told you before that I’ve got a rupee (1s/4d) bet on with another fellow that it’s over by Oct 31st.  I hope I shall win it.

 

Well we are going to Darjeeling at last, 19 of us from this Co. We leave here to-morrow, Wed 14. (I’m writing this Tues 13th).  It will be a change for us.  We’ve got to put on warm clothing! & take 2 extra blankets.  The temperature up there is about 45o whereas it was over 100o here yesterday.  So I expect we shall feel pretty cold the first few days.

 

I’m sending some photographs by this mail. They are only groups taken at Dinapore & as I don’t want to cart them up to Darjeeling I’m sending them home.  I would have sent them long ago only I’ve been going to have some done of myself alone but have not done so yet.  I was going to send them all to-gether.  I will tell you what the groups are next week & whether there’s anybody else you know in them.  They are at the bottom of my box at present.

 

Hope you are all well.

Yr loving son

George

 

Thank May for her letter of 18 Mar. Will answer it next week.

 

They are ¼d stamps on the envelope.  P.C.s go for ¼d out here, letters ½d (Inland)

 

P.T.O.

 

Just turned out photographs. They are not up to much, not worth sending in fact but as I’ve paid for them I might as well send them.  The big one & the P.C.s is No 1 Section, (my section) & the other is just an odd group.  I enclose the P.C.s.  C.A.S. is in both of them.  The chap sitting on the form on the extreme left of the Section photo was the one that was billeted with me in Sittingbourne.  G.W.R.

George Ryan’s letter home dated 8 Apr 1915

George Ryan’s letter home dated 8 Apr 1915

Barrackpore

Bengal

India.

8 April 1915

 

Dear M & F,

 

Your letter of March 12th received.  I sent my insurance card to the Society about the 2nd or 3rd week we were here so they must have got it soon after sending that notice.

 

I have not come across any place where I could get a parrot; but you need not reckon on me bringing one of those things home. I don’t suppose we could if we wanted too.  We shall have quite enough to manage as it is.  As our Colour Sergt says this is not a tea-party, we are out here as soldiers.

 

We are at Ishapore again this week on guard. There’s no upper floor to the guard-room so we find it very hot.  It is a job to get any sleep at night time.  We generally have a couple of hours sleep in the afternoon, that is if we are not on duty.  It’s too hot to do anything else.  It’s very nice this morning as I write this, on the bank of the river Hooghly; the one place where it’s a bit cool here.  There’s a nice breeze blowing.

 

I went to Calcutta again last Sat.  It’s a treat to see a little of town life now & again.  We had a ride round in a 1st class garrey as far as St Paul’s Cathedral.  We had a look in there; it’s a fine building but very small for a Cathedral.  We came across an English watch maker so I’ve left my watch with him to be mended.  It’s going to cost me 5 or 6 “chips” (7/- or 8/-).

 

I think we shall go to Darjeeling next week I hope so at any rate.

 

I had some more papers from Holt this week.

 

Hoping you are all well.

Your affec son

George

Dick-Cunyngham letter to wife dated 30 Mar 1915

Dick-Cunyngham letter to wife dated 30 Mar 1915

Our Wedding Day

My own darling one,

 

Must scribble a line somehow. Your 2 dear letters today.  I have kept the nice long one in my pocket all day.  Read it last night & took it to bed with me meaning to read it again but I fell asleep.  Read it again this morning – my only peaceful time to myself – viz – usual *** after breakfast!! & another dear one this morning.

 

Duly cake delicious arrived yesterday – had some for tea.  Am feeling wonderfully fit in spite of practically no sleep or rest – we start out 1 a.m.  General went to bed 7 p.m. – I did not get back till 8 p.m. & got up at 12.15 a.m. it’s now 9.15 p.m.!  So think I must try for a little sleep – but how could I pass this day without a line to my darling one – the dear memories of our happy times at Abagain & all the happy days we spent there.  Darling one – about the message by all means take it up but find out first how long it really take to be proficient.  Yes I think you are right there must be a great shortage of masseuse – you are sweet my darling one, always thinking of what you can do for others –  wish I could think same like – Dear Freddie’s remarks are I fear fairly true!  I have often wondered myself how Geoff & I have remained here – the old man – my nickname for him is “Systematic Joe” – has been terrible the last few days – I have worked like a slave – & he never seems satisfied – but I have refused “to kick against the pricks” – it has been hard at times – & every night I pray that I may be able to carry on and do my work as he expects – but it is very hard.  I fear he doesn’t realise things a bit – if I did all he expects I should want at least 48 hours for every 24 – my darling why should I complain on this happy day – we are having glorious weather here – the country peep from my window is very nice and the lake & moat nice blue water – I’m getting rather attached to Mont K.

 

All your news of Regt is most interesting, glad Johnnie Stansfeld is not bad – well my darling – sleep or work – which I wonder. Have enough work to keep me up till 12 – feel very inclined to do some more & then doss in a chair till 12.30 a.m. & then walk round trenches.

 

All my love precious one Yr ***        Jimmie

 

With envelope addressed to Mrs J. Dick Cunyngham, Heslington, Croft Road. Crowborough, England.  Signed Dick Cunyngham.  Passed by Censor No 1354 cachet.  Postmarked FIELD POST OFFICE 14.  30 MR 15.

George Ryan’s letter home dated 25 Mar 1915

George Ryan’s letter home dated 25 Mar 1915

Barrackpore

Bengal.

India.

25 Mar 1915

 

Dear Edie,

 

Your letter of 24th Feb received.  I hope you use all your fingers on the type-writer.  It’s very nicely done & set out but never type your name at the end.  Always sign a letter, else it might come from anybody for all the receiver knows.  (Ahem.)  Hope you passed your shorthand exam.  No, I didn’t know I’d got any certs to come, I’d forgotten all about sitting for those exams.  Please let me know what certs they are & for what speed.

 

Should like to have seen & heard you playing your duet with Mr. Beake, I suppose he saw you home safely afterwards.

 

Sorry to hear you have to work an hour longer; I suppose you miss your early evening class.

 

Remember me to Alf Tyrrell

Yr loving brother

George XX

 

George Ryan’s letter home dated 25 Mar 1915

George Ryan’s letter home dated 25 Mar 1915

Barrackpore

Bengal.

India.

25 Mar 1915

 

Dear May,

 

Your letter of 25th Feb to hand but what was the matter when you wrote it.  You miss out a word in the very first line, you miss a whole line at the bottom of the page, & sundry other slips etc.  Are you in love or were you in a hurry to get out.  Judging by your writing I should say you were in a terrific hurry.  You also commence by saying you’ve got nothing to tell me & then fill up 2 pages.  But you are not the only one that does that; Ma did it the other week.  It’s not a very cheerful thing to read at the beginning of a letter.

 

Glad to hear you are to be made a book keeper. I hope it will be at W.G. as you want it there.

 

We had a race-meeting here last Saturday. It seemed quite like London to see so many motors about; & they do fly along.  Apparently there’s no speed limit out here.  The R.F.A. (Royal Field Artillery) had one race at the meeting for a few of their horses.  There’s another meeting next Saturday.

 

You need not be afraid of me getting fat. We get plenty of exercise & any “overweight” is soon sweated out of us.  It is hot here now.

 

Yr loving brother

George XX

 

George Ryan’s letter home dated 25 Mar 1915

George Ryan’s letter home dated 25 Mar 1915

Barrackpore

Bengal.

India.

25 Mar 1915

 

Dear M & F,

 

Thanks for your note at the foot of Edie’s letter of Feb 26th.  I had a letter from Bert at Rouen; I expect he’s in the thick of it now.

 

Well as you see we are still here. We shan’t leave this week now; we expect to go next Thursday.  This place doesn’t seem to have agreed with me this last week, my inside has been a bit out of order.  I’ve had a few doses of medicine & feel almost right again now.  But I think the change of air will do me good.

 

We had a thunderstorm every evening this week. (Perhaps it was that that upset me.)  One night the lightning was very vivid; every 4 or 5 seconds, it fairly lit up the whole place, & the rain comes down in sheets.

 

Further news in girls’ letters.

Hoping you are all well, Love to all,

Yr affec son

George

 

I suppose you are keeping all my letters?