Welcome to The Bay Museum Website

The Bay Museum is a friendly museum situated on Canvey Island. Based in a degaussing station, it now offers a wealth of artefacts, books and displays focussing on Military history. Open from 10am till 4pm, the museum also organises trips to France and Belgium to experience the battlefields first hand. The museum is run by volunteers who always warmly welcome visitors and are never short of a war story!

The Bay Museum – Spherical Image – RICOH THETA

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G Hammond letter 22 September 1917

22.9.17

My dear Gladys

Cheer Oh!  I am now back again with the Bn and feeling much happier I am so very sorry about that miserable rotten letter I wrote but as you say I was feeling a bit fed up and out of sorts however Pa’s letter arrived just afterwards and bucked me up wonderfully.  The main reason why I wrote such a vile letter was because I was awfully disappointed at not receiving a letter from home on my birthday.  It was my first thought in the morning that whoever else forgot I should have one from home but it’s all right now and I have quite got over it.  I am glad you found the cheque book I quite thought I had lost it.  So pleased Ma likes the purse but I thought it would not be long before Gladys gets hold of it.  Ma seems to be coming a leading light in the Church work.  The next thing will be the parson saying “Mrs Hammond will hold her monthly sewing class.”  How does the pipe smoke?  I lost mine the other day much to my annoyance.  Let me have the watch as soon as it is ready.  I am working on an Ingersol lately which varies considerably.

You will have seen in the paper that all 2 Lieuts. of over 18 months commissioned rank become lieutenants Oh I nearly forgot Humbolt is away at present in charge on a school so I expect to be OC Coy for some time.  It was in orders that I had taken over the other day.  Whether he will come back soon remains to be seen.  I thought about you the last part of the holiday the weather was rotten.  I was awfully sorry to hear you were not so well.  I suppose you have been eating too much.  I had two PC from Gus the other day he is quite OK.  He is in the same place where I was for my course I heard their division had arrived there the day I left which was a bit of bad luck otherwise I could have met him.  I was not aware that Barters son had been wounded.  You see we has very little to do with other companies.  I received the asprin oh but am quite fit now thanks.  Oh I could not write last Sunday as I was in the line for two days.  Don’t send me any shop cakes.  I only want the proper stuff.  No shop cakes for R****.  So old Gus expects to be in civilian clothes by next Christmas.  I hope so.  The whole family seems to be very prominent in church work lately, but how Gladys can possibly resemble a marigold I don’t know, how about a sunflower.

How does the red “gun carriage” go now.  I hope it is doing a bit better than at first.  I am beginning to think the plot is not quite so flourishing as it was it is such a long time since I heard about it.

I am enclosing a circular sent round by the Colonel you will see that the maximum amount is 2£ do you think Bill would send a quid.  I thought you might send the other, if not I will send any thing with may be short.  I would suggest that you send it to the Colonels wife.  The men out here I am sure would appreciate such a gift very much.  Let me know what you are doing as soon as possible you will see that all donations must be received before 15 Oct.  Well this is all now.

Will write again next Sunday if poss, if not will send a F.P.C.

Fondest love to all

George

Letter to Mrs Hammond 20 Sept 1917

Impressed notepaper: Avon Holm

Victoria Road

Macclesfield

Sept 20th

Dear Auntie,

Just a line to let you know that I arrived home on Monday in good time for my Soldiers’ Working Party.

I have been very busy ever since I came back, and have been at School practically all day today.  I hope the farmyard is going on all night and that Turkie continues to develop those qualities that make him such a good guardian of the mansion.

We have had a letter today from our chauffeur who has been talking with a man who was in the trenches with George.  He says “Lieut Hammond is very well liked by his men” and that is something to be proud of.

There isn’t much news in Macclesfield.  It is very dark in the evenings and Jackie Lantern comes in very useful.  How is his brother?

Please tell Gladys to pen me a note when she finds the English language flowing fluently – it so rarely does, that it is a treat to hear it when it does.

Many thanks to you all for the pleasant weekend I spent with you.

Love from all to all

Yours

Elsie

 

Cover to Mrs Hammond, 9 Countess Street, Stockport, postmarked 11.45 AM 21 SP 17

 

Postcard to Rev. R.M. Laporte Payne 2 Sept 1917.

Postcard to Rev. R.M. Laporte Payne 2 Sept 1917.

 

Y.M.C.A Postcard On Active Service

 

B.E.F.

France

2.9.17

Sunday evening

Dear Mr. Payne,

 

Just a card. I am quite well.

Thought that you would care for a line or two.

Long to be in England again soon.

Kindest regards to Mrs Payne & all & trusting that you are in the best of health.

I remain Yours very sincerely

An old Herne Bay Chorister. Lionel V. Richman Sergt “The Buffs”

 

On reverse addressed to Rev W. La Porte Payne,

The Vicarage

North Finchley

London

England

at 61 Marine Avenue

Hove

Sussex

 

Postmarked A.P.O. 517 3 SEP 17. and NORTH FINCHLEY 7 SP 17.

F Springett letter 20 September 1917

FOR GOD, FOR KING & FOR COUNTRY

Y.M.C.A.

H.M. FORCES ON ACTIVE SERVICE

 

Sept 20TH 1917

 

Thursday

 

My Dear Brother Sid,

Just a few lines in answer to your welcome letter received today, so pleased to hear that you were quite well, as it leaves me very well at present.  Sorry to hear that you have a had cold, I have just got a slight one, but nothing much.

It as been awful weather here since Monday, I can tell you there is some mud.

It gets dark so quickly now, there don’t seem much time to do anything after tea.

Glad you have been busy again. I hope it will remain so.  well Dear Sid, we are moving on Sunday night as near as I can tell you, so perhaps you hadn’t better write to me again down here.

I will let you know my new address as soon as I know myself.

If you see Ted you might tell him, I am on the move I have only had one letter from him in six weeks.

Still I don’t worry about it only if he can’t write to me while I am in England, I’ll see that he don’t when I cross the ditch, which is very shortly.

I had a nice letter from Dad yesterday, he is quite well and getting on alright.

Mother sent me a parcel yesterday and a letter, they are all busy hop-picking at home and getting on alright too. Well, Dear Sid, I have enough money to carry me to Canterbury “thank you” but I should like some when you hear from me again.

It’s jolly good of you to think of me.

Well, Sid I don’t think I have any more news this time, so I will pack up.

I will send a card if we do move on Sunday.

So Goodbye Best Love

I remain

Your loving Brother

Frank William

 

P.S. Don’t tell Ted what I say, or perhaps he won’t like it.

 

With cover to Mr S.K. Springett, 29 Bath Road Dartford Kent

Postmarked HARWICH 9.45 AM 21 SP 17

WO Permit to Miss Dillon 20 September 1917

G.P.17247 A

WAR OFFICE

The undersigned…Miss Dillon L.C.

(description)…….Female Driver

 

being employed on Active Service, is hereby authorised by the Secretary of State for War to drive a motor car, lorry or bicycle, when on Government duty.

 

  1. Maude

Secretary of the War Office

L.Dillon

Signature of Holder

 

 

Available from 20-9-17 to 21-10-17

 

On reverse

 

HUTMENT SUB-DEPOT

& DEPOT TRANSPORT

NO 1 Res. M.T. Dept, Grove Park S.E.

V.E. To***** 2nd Lt

 

Date 17.10.17

 

Tel Lee Green 1820

Extension           12

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne undated September 1917

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne

 

EXTRACTED FROM.

 

Brigade Diary, Personal Diary, Operation Orders, Note Books, Memoranda

Correspondence

—————–

 

Undated September 1917

 

September 1917.

Hove Sussex.

 

After a quick but slumbersome journey I arrived with the rain at Brighton, and found M. and F. here.  I surprised them with the amount of luggage, but I was determined to enjoy mufti for a few days, though I had to travel down in uniform.

 

It was strange to be subject to the unwelcome attentions of the Boche as night visitors to London.  On my way back home I fell in with Mr. Special Constable Jordan, who ran me in for riding without a light.  It would have been amusing if he had reported me to the Superintendent, whose house I had just left.  However the offer of a cigarette appeased the official anger at such wanton flouting of the laws of our country, and I gained my own bed in my own home and not the local lock-up.

 

Brighton bores me, but I am right glad to be with my people once again.

 

I leave here Monday morning, and arrive in town to entertain the Colonel to dinner, if possible graced by female society, if not, well! He must go without.

 

Then I desire to go to some sea-side place as unlike this London by the sea as possible.  It is more populated by the nomadic Eastern tribe than ever.

A.A. Laporte Payne letter to Muriel September 1917

A.A. Laporte Payne letter to Muriel September 1917

Embossed notepaper headed:

Christ Church Vicarage

North Finchley N and struck through

61 Marine Avenue

Hove

Sussex

Undated September 1917

 

Darling,

 

After a quick but slumbersome journey I arrived with the rain at Brighton, and found Mother & Father here.  I am staying with them.  I surprised them with the amount of my luggage but I was determined to enjoy mufti for a few days but of course I had to travel down in uniform.

 

I do hope you were not very tired after the unwelcome attentions of our night visitors. On my way back Mr. Jordan ran me in for riding without a light.  It would have been amusing if he had reported me to the Superintendent whose house I had just left.  However the offer of a cigarette accepted appeased the official anger at such wanton smashing of the laws of our country, and I gained my bed in my own home and not the local lock-up.

 

Brighton bores me, but I am glad to be with my people once again and away from their duties.

 

My plans are as follows – subject to alterations and revisions, of course, by a higher authority – your ladyship. I leave here Monday morning, and arrive in town to entertain the Colonel if possible graced by female society – if not well he must go without.

 

Then I await your majesty’s commands. What I should like would be go to some sea-side place – not like this London-by-the-sea with a desert of asphalt peopled by a nomadic tribe from the East.  How would you like it?  Perhaps some good Samaritans could be inveigled into chaperoning you at such a place.  I don’t like to suggest it in case I annoy people by troubling them so much.

 

I could book rooms at a hotel somewhere if it were possible and enjoy another week by the sea.

 

However I am probably expecting too much.

 

Please give my love to Mrs Cross

With much love to you dearest & kisses (paper)

Ever your

Arch.