Letter to Miss Dillon 17 July 1919

Letter to Miss Dillon 17 July 1919

On embossed Government Notepaper
Intelligence Corps
G.H.Q.
Constantinople,
Army of the Black Sea
17th July 1919

My dearest Lillie,
I wish I were in London for the Peace Celebrations! What fun you will have! “What would I not give to be with you in the old town to-night!”
Write and tell me all about it. It will be on Anna’s birthday, won’t it? What a memorable birthday it will be for her. I have not found it possible to send the wedding presents yet. If they do not arrive in time she must not mind. I will be able to present them in person in November if not before.
I have been playing tennis the last two evenings, and I find I can play quite well. When my service comes off, people find it very difficult to return. This Camp is only a few minutes walk from the tennis courts. The subscription is 5/- a fortnight.
The youth I travelled out with from London has turned up at a camp quite close, after a period in Russia. He is going to get me a horse and we can go for rides together.
You may have noticed him. He sat beside me in the train at Charing Cross.
I had a letter from Chapman yesterday, dated 5th June, from Cape Town. He was missing London very much.
Saturday is being observed as an official holiday here to celebrate peace.
I am taking advantage of it to go to the aerodrome at San Stefano to try and get a pal I met on the journey out to take me to Bucharest.
It is rather problematical if it can be done, as there is very little flying at present. The train journey takes nearly two days, whereas it is only a couple of hours by air.
I want to see the General at the mission at Bucharest, as I feel sure I could settle it then.
Have you seen the Wilocksons recently? I wonder if you have left Grove Park now? I hope you are satisfied with your new place and that it is near London.
I met a Transilvanian the other day and it was the first chance I had of airing my Roumanian. I get Roumanian papers here. They get through quicker than any other papers in a civilised language, but there is not much news in them. We get some wonderful nights here. To-night there is a wonderful halo round Venus.
Will write again soon.
Best love to you & Anna
from Willie

someone has just started playing “Keep the Home Fires burning” and they are singing it again & again. It brings back memories of the worst part of the war and it gives me the creeps.

With cover Please Forward O.A.S. to Miss de C. Dillon, M.T. RASC., No 1 Reserve Depot, Grove Park, Lee. London S.E. 12.

Postmarked ARMY POST OFFICE Y dated 18 JY 19 and stamped PASSED BY CENSOR 490. Signed W. Dillon Lieut.

Advertisements

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne 12 July 1919

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne 12 July 1919

EXTRACTED FROM.

Brigade Diary, Personal Diary, Operation Orders, Note Books, Memoranda
Correspondence
—————–

July 10 and 12 1919

June Meeting
To be held on the Race Course
On July 10 & 12, 1919

First Race 14.00 hours each day.
1st Race. General Officers Inter-Corps Hurdle Race, open to teams of three officers not below the rank of Brigadier-General.

2nd Race. Maiden Plate, open to Infantry, R.E. and R.A.M.C.

3rd Rhineland Steeple-Chase. Winner 1500 marks.
Horses of the Allied Armies.

4th Robertson Plate. 2000 marks. Horses of Allied Armies ridden by officers.

etc

Second Day

2nd Race Allied Steeple-Chase. Allied Armies.
3rd The Cologne Plate. Horses of Army of the Rhine.
5th Victory Plate, Horses of Allied Armies.

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne 10 July 1919

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne 10 July 1919

EXTRACTED FROM.

Brigade Diary, Personal Diary, Operation Orders, Note Books, Memoranda
Correspondence
—————–

July 10, 1919
D/76 Bde., R.F.A.
I have just returned from Wiesbaden and a trip up the Rhine, which I much enjoyed. I went with the Adjutant. We occupy ourselves with sports, horse shows, races and dinners. I had five dinners in one week. We gave one to the officers of the Brigade the other day, and it was a great success. Tomorrow I go to Cologne for three days.

We were inspected the other day by the Army Artillery Commander.

My companion for so many months now, Captain Prior, has left us. He is a regular and has been transferred to England preparatory to going out East. I heard from Colonel Congreve the other day. He has been reduced to the rank of Major and posted to command a battery in Ireland. He does not seem to like it much.

So peace has been signed at last. It has made no difference to us here. The politicians seem to have made a good mess of it. The Boche are just the same as ever. They will not change. They say that they will never pay the indemnity, and that there will be another war in ten or fifteen years. I should not be at all surprised, for they are filled with thoughts of revenge. They will always hate the French, and the French know it. A German of intelligence, and considerable local importance to whom I spoke the other day, asked me this question. “If you had lost the war, would you have acquiesced?” I replied, “No, I suppose not.” At which he smiled and said, “Neither shall we.” Well there have always been wars on this frontier ever since the Romans had their German frontiers problems and I suppose it will go on.

Letter to Miss Dillon 2 July 1919

Letter to Miss Dillon 2 July 1919

On embossed Government Notepaper
G.S. “I”
G.H.Q.
Constantinople,
2nd July 1919

My dearest Lillie,
I am sending out another S.O.S to Bucharest to-day, and I must tell you about it. The Military Mission in Bucharest asked for me immediately after I came here & G.H.Q. said they would send me if the Military Mission to the Allied Armies who have their head quarters here and off shoots in Roumania did not require me. The latter obviously do not require me or they would have employed me in the meantime.
Now a month has gone by, so I keep on hoping every day for Bucharest. My motto is that of Ruhleben: – Dum Spiro Spero – while I breathe I hope.
The same applies to the I.C.S. [Indian Civil Service] and I am sure they will both come off eventually.
This is a horrible place, and I have not enough work to do.
The people are disgusting. I hate the way they barge into me in the filthy slums of streets & never apologise. Men walk about with grand pianos on their backs and stick the legs in one’s eyes! I never saw anything like the loads they carry on their backs. It is a feature of the place. Another feature is the vast multitude of bugs & flys and every second person has small-pox or leprosy.
I will write a more cheerful letter in a day or two, but must relieve my mind to-night as I know you will sympathise with me in my efforts to get to Roumania.
Best love to you & Anna
from Willie

By the way do not send any papers, as we get Punch here & the daily papers occasionally a couple of weeks late. 5.7.19

With cover O.A.S. to Miss de C. Dillon, M.T. RASC., No 1 Reserve Depot, Grove Park, Lee. London S.E. 12.

Postmarked ARMY POST OFFICE Y dated 7 JY 19 and stamped PASSED BY CENSOR 490. Signed W. Dillon Lieut.

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne June 1919

War Diary of AA Laporte Payne June 1919

EXTRACTED FROM.

Brigade Diary, Personal Diary, Operation Orders, Note Books, Memoranda
Correspondence
—————–

Sunday June 1 1919
D/76th R.F.A.
British Army of the Rhine.

I arrived back from leave yesterday at Cologne, and now I am living in the schloss. We move on Tuesday to another place, and then on the 14th go to practice camp on the other side of the Rhine.

I had a pleasant journey, but not so rapid as the forward one. I did not leave by the early morning train after all, as the R.T.O. told me they were running a special train and boat in the afternoon for staff and senior officers, who were returning en masse in case the Boche do not sign the Peace Treaty. I was glad of the extra few hours to do some shopping.

My ankle is much better and wearing a boot has not done it any harm.

Last week I escaped several General’s inspections. Leave has apparently been curtailed in case of trouble in Germany, so I was fortunate.

Everything here is as usual. There is a great change in the country side though. The trees and crops are much more advanced than in England.

I had pleasant company on my way. Another major was with me and a French Cavalry Major travelled up in the train with us. He seemed to be an excellent fellow, and was most interesting man.

June 9th 1919.
BRIGADE SPORTS.
76th Army Brigade R.F.A.

Whit Monday
Programme. 11, a.m. to 7 p.m.

Flat Races, Tug-of-war, Long jump, 440 yds, 120 yds hurdles.
High Jump, Relay race.
Officers’ jump
V.C. Race, Alarm Race, N.C.O.’s jumping, Lloyd Lindsay Race,
Led Horse jumping, Wrestling on horseback, Band Race.

(I acted as judge of mounted events.)

June 12 1919
We have moved and I have been away on business for one or two days. Our time is spent in a round of parades, inspections, training and sports.

Our sports which we have just held were a great success. Our battery was second on points. It was a lovely day. We had a band and large tents in which lunch tea and supper were served.

Yesterday we were inspected by the G.O.C. Division and the C.R.A. The former is an excellent fellow and was most agreeable. He seemed satisfied, and all he wanted me to do was to whitewash the kitchen. I turned the whole population of the village under the Burgomaster to clean up the streets of the place in the early morning, so I am not exactly popular.

Robertson inspects us this week end. The battery was photographed the other day, but the prints are not very good.

Dinner parties are the order of the evening now. The Colonel is in bed with a bad leg caused by a fall at jumping.

The Left half of the Battery beat the Right at cricket this afternoon.

Letter to Miss Dillon 23 June 1919

Letter to Miss Dillon 23 June 1919

G.S. “I”
G.H.Q.
Constantinople,
Army of Black Sea,
23rd June 1919

My dearest Lillie,
On Saturday I went for a trip up the Bosphorus right as far as the Black Sea and landed at Karak on the Asiatic side of the Bosphorus where there is an old Genoese fortress on a hill. I walked up the hill and had a great view across the Black Sea which by the way is almost a paler sky-blue than the Adriatic.
On Sunday afternoon I went to the Bazaars with my young pal who came to lunch with me, and then we went up the Golden Horn.
If I am still here next Saturday I will go to Prinkipo for the weekend. That is the island where the Bolsheviks were invited to meet and confer. It is a beautiful place I believe.
I have only had one letter from you and one from Anna yet, and I have written so often. Why don’t you write? I wish I were in London to-night when you are celebrating Peace. There is not much in the way of festivity here. I am hoping every day to get a move on. There is nothing in Constantinople except St Sophia and the Bazaars, but the Bosphorus of course is wonderful. I had a letter from Miss Wilson from S. Africa yesterday. Do you remember her at Lexham Gardens?
Best love to you & Anna
from Willie

With cover O.A.S. to Miss de C. Dillon, M.T. RASC., No 1 Reserve Depot, Grove Park, Lee. London S.E. 12.

Postmarked ARMY POST OFFICE Y dated 24 JU 19 and stamped PASSED BY CENSOR 490. Signed W. Dillon Lieut.