George Ryan’s letter home dated 18 Feb 1915

George Ryan’s letter home dated 18 Feb 1915

1945 “D” Co

9th Middlesex

Barrackpore

Bengal.

India.

18 Feb 1915

 

Dear May,

 

Thanks very much for your letter of 21 Jan with the photo enclosed.

 

Yes. I got the parcel safely as I’ve already written.  The things were in as good condition as when they left you, thanks to the tin box.  It’s the only safe way of sending things out here.  A fellow received a parcel; or rather the remains of one, this week in a cardboard box.  The contents, what was left of them, mince-pies, cake etc, were all smashed & some cigarettes were damaged.

 

Guard here is about the same as at Dinapore, in fact they say the Magazine post is worse. I have not been on that post myself yet.  There’s a native village just behind it.  There’s generally a row going on there from 8 – 10 p.m.  After that of course the jackals & hyenas insist on giving their “concert” gratis, & there are dozens of fire-flies about, they look like small stars floating about.

 

My watch dropped off my bed the other day; it’s refused to go since. I’ve been wearing it on my wrist as I can’t wear it on a chain except in my trousers pocket & it takes about a minute to get it out from there, with my tunic & equipment on.  I shall take it to Calcutta when I go but if it’s going to cost much to put right I shall buy a proper wrist watch if I can get one at a reasonable price.

 

We’ve been digging trenches this week, a very suitable occupation in this climate. It doesn’t suit me, I’ve got a blister on each hand already.  One thing about it if I can’t get a job as clerk when I come back I might stand a chance as “Sanitary Inspector” or a Road digger or something of that sort.

 

Has the “egg hand” seen you home yet. I wish I was able to come & meet you; you would be able to say then that your brother was waiting for you.

 

Yr loving brother

George

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George Ryan’s letter home dated 18 Feb 1915

George Ryan’s letter home dated 18 Feb 1915

Barrackpore

Bengal.

India.

18 Feb 1915

 

Dear Edie,

 

Thanks for your letter dated 14 Jan which I received last Friday, 12th Feb, a day after the mail had gone out.

 

We are beginning to settle down here now. It seems to get hotter every day, but we are still working hard.

 

We’ve seen a few snakes since we came here, only small ones though. Another fellow & I killed one a few days ago, it was 20” long& as thick as your finger.

 

Hope you are getting on with the piano I wish I had the chance of keeping on with it. I expect I shall have forgot nearly all I ever knew by the time I’m able to start again.

 

I have not written to you before as I don’t suppose it matters who I write to, I suppose each letter goes round the house just the same.

 

Remember me to Mr. Clark,

Yr loving brother

George

George Ryan’s letter home dated 18 Feb 1915

George Ryan’s letter home dated 18 Feb 1915
Barrackpore
Bengal.
India.
18 Feb 1915

Dear M & F,

Thanks for your letter of 14 Jan. I’ve acknowledged each one of your letters so perhaps you can tell whether I’ve received them all or not. I know I didn’t receive any for 3 weeks after Christmas but since then I’ve had one each mail either from you or May.

Yes that tale about the bullocks, or rather Buffaloes is quite right. C.S. & I were walking across from one barrack to another. It was a funny thing but just as we got near this heard of buffaloes I said to C.S. “Ump! I don’t like the look of these things.” However we kept on & just as we were passing them one of them ducked down his head & charged at us knocking C.S. over & sending me sprawling. I kept on my legs but neither of us were hurt. They are quite quiet as a rule but both of us have given them a wide berth since.

We’ve been issued out with a hair brush, 2 boot brushes, 1 button brush, clothes brush, a pair of socks, a flannel shirt, a fine sweater & another kit bag. They seem very good things too. The shirt is thinner than what you made but nice & soft & the jersey is a very good one, quite heavy. Perhaps you think it’s not much use out here, but it’s fine to put on after coming back from a route march when you’ve changed your shirt.

There’s a fine church here, much better than the one at Dinapore, better clergyman too, it’s almost like being at home the Sunday Evening service. The vicar has opened an old school-room as a reading room. There’s a good piano there so we have musical evenings. 3 or 4 young ladies sang songs the other night.

I should have thought Mr. C could have taken M. & Edie for 25/-. I asked you in one of my letters what he did about the 10/-, balance of my lessons. I suppose it was in the letter from Aden. I said I expect he kept that as I gave him no notice. I told you not to say anything about it unless he mentioned it.

Glad you are getting a few eggs now. They are cheap here. We get a couple hard-boiled now & again instead of porridge for breakfast & we can buy a couple fried at the supper bar for 6 pice (1 ½ d)

Well I think I’ve done very well this week writing to each of you & saying something different in each.

Hoping you are all well & jogging along alright.
Yr loving son
George