A.A. Laporte Payne letter 8 February 1917

A.A. Laporte Payne letter 8 February 1917

 

B.E.F.

France

Feb 8 1917

 

Darling.

 

Thank you so very much for your delightful letter which I have just received. I have not deserved it, but I was awfully glad to get it.  Also thank you so much for the cigarettes. We have been without our posts for a day or two so I got quite a lot this time.

 

I am so sorry to hear that you have got rheumatism. How on earth did you manage to get such a middle aged complaint?  You ought to go to Harrogate or Bath at once and get better.  Do you go limping about with a stick?  You really must must look after yourself more.  You have all my sympathy, but next time I hear from you I hope to have much better news.

 

Have you any better news of Mrs. Griffin? Mrs Cross must be having a very trying time.  I suppose there is no hope of her recovering from what you say.

 

Darling, I know it is horrid to be without a letter if one really wants one but you must not let the absence of one worry or annoy you. Unfortunately I am still dependant upon the moods of the Boche and the Colonel.  We live such an extraordinary life that you can’t call any minute your own.  But I can always think about you, nobody can prevent my doing that.  I can’t give you any interesting news about what we are doing as it is not allowed and I always feel you must get so sick of my constantly reiterated expressions which are so feeble in conveying what I really want to say.

 

It would look so silly to say “I love you, I love you” to the nth time which is all I am really capable of doing.  I don’t like love making by letter as it always seems like getting some one else to do it and everything depends upon the way in which you say things and the way in which it is taken.  You may be in a mood when you receive my letter what I can’t appreciate when I write and I don’t suppose I should say much even if I saw you.  Do you think I should have much time for talking.  I hope not.  Now I must behave myself; but oh! I do wish I could see you now and feel what it is like once again to hold you tight and kiss you & kiss you until you could not kiss any more – but that would not be at all proper would it?

 

I should make your face so red, and ruffle your hair too much – and you would be cross – and then I should get into trouble.  But I should like to see you angry if you could make it up again in the proper way.  I can imagine you saying “How dare you, sir”.

 

I hope you have been behaving yourself well lately. Maude appears to have disgraced herself sitting upon some tommy’s knee in the Tube.  You ought to be able to look after her better than that.

 

The weather here is still bitter. I suppose it is just the same with you.  I was down in the front line the whole of the morning and it was so cold.  I was quite glad to get back to the office again.

 

Bar rheumatism how are you all keeping? Please give my kindest regards to Mrs. Cross.  I hope she is keeping well.  Next time you write please tell me that your rheumatism is better.

 

We have not had any newspapers for two days now. I can’t think what is the matter.  I hope England has not been submarined.  You will get thin on the food ration.  It will soon be better to be rationed out here than at home won’t it?

 

One more month and then we shall expect spring and all the other things spring will bring with it. I put the war down as ending in August.  What do you think?  It will be strange to have no war we have got so used to it that we shall quite miss it.

 

No post has come up to day again. Something is wrong behind or they are getting very slack.

 

Goodnight & pleasant dreams

With all my love & kisses

Ever yours

Archie.

 

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